REVEAL – The Grey Tower Trilogy: Circadian Circle

If you’re a regular around this patch of the web, I hope you’ll remember my reviews on the Grey (Gray, take your fancy) Tower Trilogy books, the Tower’s Alchemist followed by Dark Rift.

Well, it’s very nearly time, for the release of the third and final book in the series, Circadian Circle! I’m honoured to be kicking off the blog tour for author Alesha Escobar.

The reviews I gave for the first two books, The Tower’s Alchemist and Dark Rift were pretty smashing, both scoring a nine out of ten – and rightly so. These books are awesome. I’m not going to go back into what made them so great, just skim over the reviews to see that, because there’s reems of it. Ms. Escobar is certainly one to watch.

So here it is, our cover reveal for Circadian Circle, just look at that.

Circadian Circle Cover

Not only that, but Ms. Escobar has allowed me something rather special for the readers here at datbookreviews – a chance at getting yourself a free copy of the book!

But it doesn’t stop there… oh no! That’s not the only prize. Here’s what’s on offer, so sign up and you’re in with a chance and one of these:

– A signed Paperback copy of ‘The Tower’s Alchemist’ and ‘Dark Rift’
– One of two $10 Amazon Gift Cards
– One of two Tote bags bearing the slogan “keep calm and call the ministry”
– One of three art print cards with character artwork from the series
– One of five ebook copies of the whole series.

So check out the link!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

I heartily encourage all of my readers to get their hands on a copy of the book; because whilst I’ve only read a little little bit, it’s going to be good. If you haven’t started with the Grey Tower Trilogy, it’s time to pick up the first book on Amazon.

Disclaimer: I do not benefit from the purchase, and am not in direct affiliation with Alesha Escobar the author. As a book review sight, any suggestion to purchase a novel is purely the recommendation of that novel as a worthy read. Cheers!

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Radagast the Brown in Jackson’s ‘The Hobbit’

Okay, so I’ve just watched The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey again; it being Peter Jackson’s rendition of the book (the first part at least). I just fell to thinking about how it measures up to my preconceptions having read the book, and the LOTR Appendices.

As a film, I like it. It’s pretty good, and I love Martin Freeman as Bilbo, I think he’s a splendid character match.

Right, I can’t wait any longer, I need to rant about the things I don’t agree with!

Thorin: I like the character portrayal, he seems dark and brooding. I just don’t like the way some of the ways he pronounces his words. He has a little bit of an accent I find slightly out of character. For example, he says ‘Gandolf’ instead of ‘Gandalf’. I think it a bit odd how all of the Dwarves are from the same background, yet only Thorin has the accent. Odd.

The Trolls: Okay, I know that The Hobbit’s target audience is a bit younger than LOTR was, it’s meant to entertain children to some extent. However, I find the trolls just a little too comical. The part when the one blows his nose over Bilbo I find very displeasing to my tastes; I should have preferred it more serious. But hey, that’s just my taste and a deep respect for the literature of which it was born.

Azog: I’m sorry. There are no words for my dislike of this plotline. Azog dies in the Battle of Azanulbizar in Third Age year 2799. His son Bolg features much later in the Hobbit.

Radagast: In my mind, Radagast has always been, and will continue to be a wise man. A master of birds and beasts and in tune with the forest. Peter Jackson has painted him as some crackpot with bird droppings down his face and a birds nest under his hat. Absolutely not. I have always imagined Radagast as a tall, silver haired man of green cloak with a raven on his shoulder. I won’t let the film chap cut that from my head. For the role of the crackpot though, the actor does remarkably and I commend him.

So, yes. Little bit of a rant but there you have it.

Tablets and e-Readers: A Followup

Hi all, I thought some people might be interested in a followup regarding the poll I created on how people read. The post was ‘Do You Own an e-Reader or Tablet?’ and you can find the poll there; I’d still love for you to vote! I’ve had fourteen votes now, and not many more are coming in, so I thought it high time to reveal all and make a few comments. Obviously it’s an open poll and anybody can read the results, but I expect chances are if you voted you haven’t looked back at it since.

So, here are the results.

Do You Own an e-Reader or Tablet?
Yes! A dedicated e-Reader. (eg Kindle Paperwhite, Kobo etc) 6 votes, 42.86
Yes! A tablet on which I read. (eg iPad, Nexus 7, Kindle Fire 5 votes, 35.71%
Yes! I have both of these things. 2 votes, 14.29%
No! I read solid books and don’t own (or don’t read from) a tablet or e-Reader.
1 vote, 7.14%

So, what I can see from this is as follows; the vast majority of people who voted read on e-Platforms, be that tablet or dedicated device. Currently it seems that it is the dedicated e-Readers that’re taking the cake on this, but it’s very close and the votes seemed to see-saw on this (last time I looked, most people were using their tablets), so to me that’s fairly equal.
A couple lucky fellows have both of these devices, and so assumingly read on the dedicated e-Reader (though not definitely, perhaps I should have split this question into a ‘Yes, both, but I read on X/Y.’. And then there’s that one person whom reads only solid paper books. You know what I say to that? Good for you, dear Sir or Ma’am! If that’s how you like it, don’t feel pressured into making the swap.

On a final note, a shout out of thanks to the two people who tweeted the poll and probably helped garner a few more votes.

Okay, a second final note: The poll is not closed! You can still vote, and I’d really really love for you to do so! Please, tweet, facebook, post links to and share that poll. If there’s a surge of votes I’ll be able to write a more detailed analysis of it, which I’d love to do, but I can’t on only fourteen votes.

Let me just say that this poll is not necessarily wholly reliable. It is a very valid point that people who use the internet and frequent blogs like this may be more in tune with the e-Reading side of life and that those that read normal books may not be in a position to use the poll. Thus, I’ll say this – if you know somebody who only reads solid books, or know somebody that does any of the options, throw in a vote for their sake, will you?

If you’ve got any thoughts on the matter, please comment! I’d love to chat to you.

Summertime

Hello all, sorry for the delay. Summer has finally hit rainy Somerset, and I will admit I have been having a bit of a break. Reviews will be fairly slow on the coming around now, as I’m taking some time to reread some old favourites in the sun.

Thanks,
Tom.

The Tree of Mindala (Elle Jacklee) Book Review

Good morning (or afternoon, or evening) all, and here we are with my latest book review: The Tree of Mindala, by Elle Jacklee. I’m sorry this book has taken me the two weeks to read, but it’s a fairly sized book at 306 pages, and hey, I’m not technically working to any deadlines here; reading takes time! You see, before I started reviewing on request predominantly, I would review books I’d read before, so I could just skim-read through them to remind me of the plot and so forth, bringing all my feelings on reading it for the first time back to the fore. When reading these new books though, I get to sit down and read through a story that’s new to me, and that takes time as it rightly should. So, lets get going.


The Tree of Mindala is the story of siblings Miranda and Marcus Moon, two normal children going to a normal school. One thing though – Miranda’s obsession with adventure and her runaway imagination tend to land her in trouble, and having gone one step too far, she’s been suspended from school. Miranda’s parents decide to take the children on a holiday, of sorts, to a cabin in the forest owned by their late grandparents, Truman and Sunny. It’s halloween time though, and everything is not as it seems. Miranda finds a glass snow globe in which a little house is depicted. Miranda turns the globe upside-down, and that’s when things really get weird.

Miranda and Marcus both find themselves in front of the very stone house that had been in the snow globe. Little did they know that they had just entered Wunderwood, a land of trees and magic – and they had just freed the worst warlock of the lot – Thornton.
Continue reading

Forever Burn (Adrian Smith) Book Review

Sorry it’s been a little while folks, but all my exams are over now! So I should have a lot more time to read and write, which will be lovely. So, this book ‘Forever Burn’ was sent to me for review by one Adrian Smith, and I’m very glad to have had the privilege of reading it. It is the first in a series, which will be gaining a prequel soon. Right, I best get on with a review!


Forever Burn is the story of James Matthews, a firefighter trying to make a difference in the world. Trained to stay calm in dangerous situations, James is a professional. However, she is having recurrent dreams; dreams about a girl she pulled from a fire years ago. They aren’t just normal flashbacks, and James has a feeling something is wrong. That’s not all though. Her secret love at the fire station is pressuring her for a more open relationship; but it doesn’t take long for that relationship to open James up to a world she’s never imagined, and a world she is inexplicably part of. Continue reading

The Language of Stones (Robert Carter) Book Review

Right then, let’s get this show on the road! I have now finished the most recent book I’ve been commissioned to review by an author; ‘The Language of Stones’ by Robert Carter, the first book of a trilogy set. In fact, I came across Robert’s work myself, on the Goodreads website. I read through his biography and tre book description and I was enthralled, it sounded great. I sent Robert an email if he’d like a review of the book, and to m delight he said yes. And what a journey it’s been for me through this book.


The Language of Stones is, as Robert himself describes it, a story about a boy becomes a man. Young William (or Will, or Willand, or even Willy-Wag Staff) is a boy from a small village called Nether Norton. That’s what he thinks anyway, but a certain wizard knows more than that, and reveals even less. Master Gwydion appears at Will’s house at the dark of night, and whisks him away with all but no explanation.
A magic flows through the land, through the ligns, channels of power connecting many stones together. Stones of power. For these are the Ancient Stones, in which is contained much of the harm of the realm. Times are changing though, and the power of the lorc flows. The battlestones begin drawing men and etching out suffering to the world. Master Gwydion believes that he has the key, the young boy Willand, to prevent the calamity of war. However, Maskull, an evil sorcerer akin to Gwydion himself plots against him, and threatens to use the battlestones to wreak havoc. Gwydion and Willand must move quickly, for the third coming of Great Arthur is at hand!

Note: I have found it very difficult to summarize The Language of Stones, for it is a very deep and complex novel, and I can’t quite seem to pin it down in words. It is a tale of epic proportions; of magic, heroism and the love and loss of many. For a full description, read the author’s words on his work here. Continue reading