Summertime

Hello all, sorry for the delay. Summer has finally hit rainy Somerset, and I will admit I have been having a bit of a break. Reviews will be fairly slow on the coming around now, as I’m taking some time to reread some old favourites in the sun.

Thanks,
Tom.

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The Tree of Mindala (Elle Jacklee) Book Review

Good morning (or afternoon, or evening) all, and here we are with my latest book review: The Tree of Mindala, by Elle Jacklee. I’m sorry this book has taken me the two weeks to read, but it’s a fairly sized book at 306 pages, and hey, I’m not technically working to any deadlines here; reading takes time! You see, before I started reviewing on request predominantly, I would review books I’d read before, so I could just skim-read through them to remind me of the plot and so forth, bringing all my feelings on reading it for the first time back to the fore. When reading these new books though, I get to sit down and read through a story that’s new to me, and that takes time as it rightly should. So, lets get going.


The Tree of Mindala is the story of siblings Miranda and Marcus Moon, two normal children going to a normal school. One thing though – Miranda’s obsession with adventure and her runaway imagination tend to land her in trouble, and having gone one step too far, she’s been suspended from school. Miranda’s parents decide to take the children on a holiday, of sorts, to a cabin in the forest owned by their late grandparents, Truman and Sunny. It’s halloween time though, and everything is not as it seems. Miranda finds a glass snow globe in which a little house is depicted. Miranda turns the globe upside-down, and that’s when things really get weird.

Miranda and Marcus both find themselves in front of the very stone house that had been in the snow globe. Little did they know that they had just entered Wunderwood, a land of trees and magic – and they had just freed the worst warlock of the lot – Thornton.
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Do you own an e-Reader or Tablet?

Okay, quite recently I mentioned the fact that I’d invested in a tablet, for both productivity and entertainment reasons. Something that’s been huge in recent years is the rise of the e-Reader. Lots and lots of people now have Kindles or Tablets or similar products on which they read their books (dubbed e-Books and e-Readers, ‘e’ being ‘electronic’). However, there’s also that group of people that have set themselves against this change to reading, and stick with the tradition of going to the bookstore, buying a book made of paper and reading it that way.

For me, there’s a lot to be said about reading ‘real’ books. It’s not something you can replicate on a screen – the feel of the pages, the smell of the new book and so on. I think that I’ll always prefer reading a physical book. However, I’ve realised that for new and upcoming authors, it’s far easier to get published to an online ‘e-Marketplace’ like the Amazon Kindle store. So when I’ve been reviewing books for people, they’ve been sent to me in electronic formats. You see, I didn’t have an e-Reader, so this posed me a problem and I was reading all these books on my brother’s Kindle. I’d been interested in getting a Tablet for a while, and eventually I did a little research and bought myself a Google Nexus 7 for £200. I’ve enjoyed the ease of being able to put the book onto my tablet and read it wherever I go, essentially taking a library of books with me that I’d never fit into my bag or pockets! At home though, I much rather read in book that I can hold. Something that’s been peeving me since the sun started coming out was that I’ve discovered I don’t like sitting in the sun and reading from my tablet like I can read from a book. The screen’s too dark and it just all-round feels wrong.

So, I guess I’m mainly in the camp of people that prefer their books to be real. I’ve got no aversions to, and enjoy using my tablet e-Reader though (I use the Kindle app for Android as opposed to Google’s own ‘Play Books’ app, because you can’t import your own books into Play – boo Google!). However, we bought my Nan a Kindle Paperwhite for Christmas, and she’s taken to it really well. She loves how light it is, as she tells me she finds it difficult to hold heavy books like hardbacks when she’s reading in bed. Another thing she enjoys is that on the Kindle marketplace, lots and lots of the classics she read as a child are free, so she’s working through lot’s of nostalgia there. So whilst you might stereotype the elder generation into standing staunchly by their books, I can see that this isn’t always the case.

So, what do you think? Please, comment and I’ll get back to you because I’d love to hear everybody’s thoughts on the whole thing. Also, and if you don’t have time to comment, please click the box on the poll below!

Forever Burn (Adrian Smith) Book Review

Sorry it’s been a little while folks, but all my exams are over now! So I should have a lot more time to read and write, which will be lovely. So, this book ‘Forever Burn’ was sent to me for review by one Adrian Smith, and I’m very glad to have had the privilege of reading it. It is the first in a series, which will be gaining a prequel soon. Right, I best get on with a review!


Forever Burn is the story of James Matthews, a firefighter trying to make a difference in the world. Trained to stay calm in dangerous situations, James is a professional. However, she is having recurrent dreams; dreams about a girl she pulled from a fire years ago. They aren’t just normal flashbacks, and James has a feeling something is wrong. That’s not all though. Her secret love at the fire station is pressuring her for a more open relationship; but it doesn’t take long for that relationship to open James up to a world she’s never imagined, and a world she is inexplicably part of. Continue reading